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herkcy

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Posts: 6
Reply with quote  #1 
I am a sales person for a broad line food distributor.  I am not unhappy, but do realize my work ethic is equating to giving too much "flesh", i.e. seven days a week, evenings, etc.  The toll on myself and my wife is sometimes unfair.  I still have 25 +/- years until retirement.  I have good experience (awards, etc.).  With that said I'm willing to give up some "flesh" for monetary reward, but I'm interested in the best avenue (work life balance) in exchange for the same reward ($100,000+/year).  Looking for some advice.  Broker (heard the monetary reward is lessor), manufacturer rep (heard the monetary reward is lessor) and sales rep (which I know).  Are my assumptions wrong?  Are there other roles in the food industry where you can make six figures, but have more of a work life balance?  Sorry for the long winded question, but appreciate all the expertise this board offers.  Thanks!
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herkcy
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DENFOODIE

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Posts: 39
Reply with quote  #2 
Yes, there are jobs within the industry that pay six figures and not as demanding. There are also many jobs out die the industry, in sales, that pay as well or better. Just look around, start applying and you never know what comes up. Foodservice is a grind and it consumes as much time as you let it and some.
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JustAnObserver

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Posts: 49
Reply with quote  #3 
There are some jobs that would require a temporary step back for future leadership roles. For instance, COP Specialist (or insert another category) -> COP Buyer -> COP Category Manager -> Director of Merchandising. That would put you into the lower $100k's +bonus. Obviously those titles will differ, but roughly same pathway. Similar routes are available from Specialist to Marketing Manager, or even switching over to the National Account side and pushing for a Manager or Director role. 
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ISellLettuce

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Posts: 123
Reply with quote  #4 
As with anything, the harder you choose to work, the better chance you have to earn. Just ask any entrepreneur. You get what you give when it comes to work ethic. That mileage varies for different individuals but the "work less, make more" mentality is a bad one to have in sales. Every (successful) sales person will tell you that its the grind that pays the bills. But that's not for everyone. It's demanding. If its not for you, then perhaps a different line of work is your best path.

Sales is unique in the fact that in most organizations (food industry or otherwise), you have nearly unlimited earning potential. The harder you work, the more you kill. The more you kill, the better you eat. Not many other professions offer that ability.

In terms of work-life balance, you control your own life. Don't want to take Sunday orders? Don't. Set your customers up online, for example. Don't want to take customer calls past 5pm? Don't. Set the expectation with your customer that you'll call them back first thing in the morning if they leave you a voicemail. You can service your customers without having them abuse your kindness. Remember, you set your own schedule most of the time as a sales rep. You can provide your own work-life balance. Just remember that you have goals you need to hit based upon how much you choose to work. Sales goals, obviously income goals, etc. If you can hit your performance and income goals working Mon-Fri 8-5, then everyone would be applauding you, including your manager.

As far as career path goes, sales still offers the same paths mentioned above: District Manager - Bus Dev Manager - Specialists - Bus Resources - Chefs -  Regional, VP, EVP etc. Sounds like you're younger, but if you prove yourself as a sales rep and demonstrate leadership abilities, after "paying your dues" and honing your skills, apply into a management position so you can put those sharp skills to good use. In food service, nearly every position on the sales side of things will pay close to, or above 100,000 a year, especially when you figure in any bonus or incentives included with the positions. 

Best of luck in your soul searching. As an old sales guy who loves selling, I have the harder I work, the luckier I get mentality.   



Quote:
Originally Posted by herkcy
I am a sales person for a broad line food distributor.  I am not unhappy, but do realize my work ethic is equating to giving too much "flesh", i.e. seven days a week, evenings, etc.  The toll on myself and my wife is sometimes unfair.  I still have 25 +/- years until retirement.  I have good experience (awards, etc.).  With that said I'm willing to give up some "flesh" for monetary reward, but I'm interested in the best avenue (work life balance) in exchange for the same reward ($100,000+/year).  Looking for some advice.  Broker (heard the monetary reward is lessor), manufacturer rep (heard the monetary reward is lessor) and sales rep (which I know).  Are my assumptions wrong?  Are there other roles in the food industry where you can make six figures, but have more of a work life balance?  Sorry for the long winded question, but appreciate all the expertise this board offers.  Thanks!
0
conman44

Junior Member
Registered:
Posts: 13
Reply with quote  #5 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ISellLettuce
As with anything, the harder you choose to work, the better chance you have to earn. Just ask any entrepreneur. You get what you give when it comes to work ethic. That mileage varies for different individuals but the "work less, make more" mentality is a bad one to have in sales. Every (successful) sales person will tell you that its the grind that pays the bills. But that's not for everyone. It's demanding. If its not for you, then perhaps a different line of work is your best path.

Sales is unique in the fact that in most organizations (food industry or otherwise), you have nearly unlimited earning potential. The harder you work, the more you kill. The more you kill, the better you eat. Not many other professions offer that ability.

In terms of work-life balance, you control your own life. Don't want to take Sunday orders? Don't. Set your customers up online, for example. Don't want to take customer calls past 5pm? Don't. Set the expectation with your customer that you'll call them back first thing in the morning if they leave you a voicemail. You can service your customers without having them abuse your kindness. Remember, you set your own schedule most of the time as a sales rep. You can provide your own work-life balance. Just remember that you have goals you need to hit based upon how much you choose to work. Sales goals, obviously income goals, etc. If you can hit your performance and income goals working Mon-Fri 8-5, then everyone would be applauding you, including your manager.

As far as career path goes, sales still offers the same paths mentioned above: District Manager - Bus Dev Manager - Specialists - Bus Resources - Chefs -  Regional, VP, EVP etc. Sounds like you're younger, but if you prove yourself as a sales rep and demonstrate leadership abilities, after "paying your dues" and honing your skills, apply into a management position so you can put those sharp skills to good use. In food service, nearly every position on the sales side of things will pay close to, or above 100,000 a year, especially when you figure in any bonus or incentives included with the positions. 

Best of luck in your soul searching. As an old sales guy who loves selling, I have the harder I work, the luckier I get mentality.   



0
conman44

Junior Member
Registered:
Posts: 13
Reply with quote  #6 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ISellLettuce
As with anything, the harder you choose to work, the better chance you have to earn. Just ask any entrepreneur. You get what you give when it comes to work ethic. That mileage varies for different individuals but the "work less, make more" mentality is a bad one to have in sales. Every (successful) sales person will tell you that its the grind that pays the bills. But that's not for everyone. It's demanding. If its not for you, then perhaps a different line of work is your best path.

Sales is unique in the fact that in most organizations (food industry or otherwise), you have nearly unlimited earning potential. The harder you work, the more you kill. The more you kill, the better you eat. Not many other professions offer that ability.

In terms of work-life balance, you control your own life. Don't want to take Sunday orders? Don't. Set your customers up online, for example. Don't want to take customer calls past 5pm? Don't. Set the expectation with your customer that you'll call them back first thing in the morning if they leave you a voicemail. You can service your customers without having them abuse your kindness. Remember, you set your own schedule most of the time as a sales rep. You can provide your own work-life balance. Just remember that you have goals you need to hit based upon how much you choose to work. Sales goals, obviously income goals, etc. If you can hit your performance and income goals working Mon-Fri 8-5, then everyone would be applauding you, including your manager.

As far as career path goes, sales still offers the same paths mentioned above: District Manager - Bus Dev Manager - Specialists - Bus Resources - Chefs -  Regional, VP, EVP etc. Sounds like you're younger, but if you prove yourself as a sales rep and demonstrate leadership abilities, after "paying your dues" and honing your skills, apply into a management position so you can put those sharp skills to good use. In food service, nearly every position on the sales side of things will pay close to, or above 100,000 a year, especially when you figure in any bonus or incentives included with the positions. 

Best of luck in your soul searching. As an old sales guy who loves selling, I have the harder I work, the luckier I get mentality.   






This is great advice, I would bet a weeks commissions you bring a lot of value to your customers. The points you touch make a sales career sustainable long term.
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