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formerdsr

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Reply with quote  #17 
Prepackaged food? You mean like the stuff you get at 7-11 or gas station? That's ridiculous!  You might as well sell military MREs. They're prepackaged, too.
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iSELLboxes

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Posts: 26
Reply with quote  #18 
Quote:
Originally Posted by formerdsr
Prepackaged food? You mean like the stuff you get at 7-11 or gas station? That's ridiculous!  You might as well sell military MREs. They're prepackaged, too.


I like MREs. That's fun!
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pink_slip_soon

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Reply with quote  #19 
New Scoop season is always entertaining, mostly for the ridicule it gets
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formerdsr

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Posts: 189
Reply with quote  #20 
I went on the US Foods website, but couldn't find the fall scoop. Could post a link to it? Thanks!

Quote:
Originally Posted by pink_slip_soon
New Scoop season is always entertaining, mostly for the ridicule it gets
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veteran20

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Reply with quote  #21 
I was hoping with KKR back on the board we would see smart profitable changes to gaining back business.... nope, same a usual crap ....

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Investigator

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Reply with quote  #22 
Pietro comes from the Loblaw conglomerate in Canada owned by the Weston family who along with the Bronfman family , Riechman family, Desmarais family make up some of the largest  business grouping in Canada. i believe Ace Bakery was named a supplier of the year recently for US Foods and they are a Weston/Loblaw owned bakery. 


The Anglo-Canadian Weston family controls the fourth major business group we consider in detail. Garfield Weston (1898 – 1978) built his father’s Toronto bakery into a huge food processing, distribution and retail empire without running up large debts. This let him assemble a large business group by acquiring troubled firms during the Great Depression of the 1930s. By the 1940s, the group had member firms in Canada, Britain and the United States; and Garfield had a Tory seat in the British parliament. During World War II, the group bought E.B. Eddy, a match company, from former Prime Minister R.B. Bennett. After the war, the group continued expanding in Canada, the United Kingdom and other Commonwealth countries. 11 The group’s most publicly prominent firms in the postwar decades were Twinings Tea, the Fine Fare supermarket chain, and Aerated Bread Company in Britain; National Tea in the US; and the Loblaw’s supermarket chain in Canada. By 1971, the group was overextended and highly levered. Garfield abdicated in favor of his son W. Galen, who began downsizing the group rapidly. With the group still teetering on bankruptcy, Galen brought in his university classmate Eric Nicol, who imposed yet more downsizing and began a major rationalization and reorganization. Restored to financial health, the group survived the early 1990s recession and interest rate spike, and began expanding again, notably with the acquisition of a control block in Selfridges, a British department store chain. In 2006, W. Galen stepped aside at Loblaw Companies in favor of his son, Galen G. Weston, while still retaining the executive chair at George Weston Limited. The Weston family remains a major presence in the Canadian economy. Figure 6 sketches out the major components of the group in 1990 and 2010. 3.5 Other Major Business Groups The Thomson Group expanded internationally, and is arguably no longer primarily Canadian.
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