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TAZ

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Reply with quote  #17 

This post is very interesting. It is similar in context to switching from McCormick spices to Tellen Foods spices. Both Stanislaus and McCormick have become to big and arrogant. They have both lost sight of the end user. This story will be repeated many, many times with different manufacturers/products because of distributor salespeople. The good salespeople fight for their customers and by doing so increase their commissions. Redsauce learned about this opportunity from a salesperson that wanted to truly help his customer, and by doing so helped his company and himself. This story is what separates salespeople from order takers.

Who ever the salesperson was, congratulations! Keep up the great work! Most readers of this post could learn from this example. Continually challenge the status quo and find answers to customers issues. You will win in the long run!


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TAZ

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Notyabiz

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Reply with quote  #18 

Taz makes a great point...I try to get prospects to understand this concept while asking them to change from their current distributor to me. I tell them that I am better than what they have now and that everybody does the things that their current rep is doing.

 

But once I take the account I make sure that my new customer understand that I am like that Stanislaus Tomato which they have relied on for so many years...I will be around and consistant while all the others sell out. 

 

PS & FYI to FSVeteran... Escalon use to be a great product until they sold out to Heinz a number of years ago - now it is like the rest...a dark bland sauce... Just like the reps I take accounts away from.

 

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JohnBeresfordTipton

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Reply with quote  #19 
I don't think Stanislaus is arrogant and they're certainly not too big.  They're INDEPENDENT.  Dino is gutsy and strong willed...he's one of those "bigger than life" people.  Doesn't he do what everyone is urging packers to do?  Doesn't he stand up to the big distributors and not take their crap?

People are constantly waiting for SOMEONE to "just say no" to the extortion demands of the big distributors, aren't they?


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TAZ

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Reply with quote  #20 
Hey Rat:

Well said and well stated! In today's competitive environment distributors have many choices and sources to compete against over priced national brands. Private brands offer opportunities for additional margins for the company, commissions for the salesperson and ultimately savings the end user!

The trend will only continue to gain momentum! National brand manufacturers need to wake up and realize that there are many alternatives to almost any product.


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TAZ

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relishtodayketchuptomorow

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Reply with quote  #21 
Nice post Rat but how do you answer the question of consistency with a private label product? Sure it depends on the label and packer, specs that need to be adhered too, but will the product be the same from week to week? If not what do you tell the end user? Nothing and wait till the customer mentions something if they notice changes?

My only reservation with the private label concerns the issue of consistency. Maybe it's a non-issue?
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DeliveryInRear

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Reply with quote  #22 
I think you give too much credit to the customer. 95% of people out there are served absolute sh*t on a plate -every-single-day- and they pay for it happily. Most diners don't even know (or realize) how bad the food is.

You think the consistency of a canned tomato is going to make or break this dudes business? And now we're talking cost-per-serving? You want to sell me some paint-protection and an extended warranty with that, too?

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TAZ

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Reply with quote  #23 
Wow DeliveryinRear,

Too much credit to the customer? I know if it weren't for the customers YOU wouldn't have to worry about being creative, looking for solutions, solving problems, etc... Customers are the people who actually write your check. Yes pennies per serving based on volume consumption add in over the long run. If he can save 12K per year on tomatoes more power to him! Yes I am sure the stupid customer will continue to monitor the quality and if the quality changes he will either switch back or find an alternative product. As far as customers (the diners) being served crap, you are way out of line. If that were the case then the restaurant will fail. Most diners go back because they are happy with the food quality (very stupid comment) and service. Personally I don't care what the restaurant uses in the back of the house if my meal tastes good, the service is friendly, the place is clean and I perceive a value for my dollar. Maybe you don't believe in yourself or your company.

The restaurant chain that switched tomatoes is looking at the bottom line, which is why they are in business.

Very weird point of view and posting!


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TAZ

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DeliveryInRear

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Reply with quote  #24 
Huh?

I used the term customer to describe the person eating the food - the patron/diner. Not the operator.

I honestly don't think most *diners* would tell the difference.

And the price of a case is the price of a case is the price of a case. I get frustrated when I hear sales reps describe a product in "it's only 6 cents more per serving!".

Oh, ok. Maybe the operator forgot his elementary math basics:

1/2 = 2/4 = 4/8 = 8/16

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TAZ

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Reply with quote  #25 
What exactly are you trying to say? The price of a case does not in any way tell the actual food cost. Here is some basic information for you: Even though every product is invoiced as a case price, the true cost of goods/food cost is measured by portion cost/per serving. If you think that a 27 lb case of fries is the same as a 30 lb case of fries, then you have failed to understand/learn the basic element of foodservice sales. You probably think your commission is based on cases sold not gross profit.

Please explain your logic of: And the price of a case is the price of a case is the price of a case. I get frustrated when I hear sales reps describe a product in "it's only 6 cents more per serving!".


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TAZ

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TAZ

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Reply with quote  #26 
Hey Rat:

Once again, well said! The national manufacturers do it all the time as well!


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TAZ

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ManufRep

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Reply with quote  #27 
DIR, I have to disagree with you.  Not only am I in the business but I am also a "customer" or "diner" and I do notice change.  I can tell you numerous stories (as a diner) about a once favorite restaurant that I no longer patronize for the exact reason we are discussing.  The operator built a fine establishment and a loyal customer base.  Business is good.  A hard economy hits and the operator looks for ways to cut costs.  That's fine as long as the "cuts" don't affect the product or service.  A once pounded chicken breast becomes a thin cut breast.  A good marinara becomes a bitter one with a sheen of oil on the top.  Even the soda machine can be a target.  My wife is a diehard diet coke fan.  That's all she drinks.  No pepsi.  Our favorite wing joint always served good fountain drinks.  About 2 years ago, she noticed that the mix wasn't right.  We just assumed the BIB was about empty and didn't complain.  The next visit a few weeks later, the exact same thing.  We asked the bartender for another or if the BIB needed to be changed.  He said it was full and poured another drink.  Same.........they had adjusted the syrup flow in order to conserve product and hoped nobody would notice.  Well, when we go out, that place rarely gets our business because the drinks aren't right.

You better give the "diner" a bit more credit.  It will bite you in the a$$ if you don't.

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TMAN

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Reply with quote  #28 
If you haven't noticed, Stanislaus doesn't put a nutritional statement on their labels or cases.  What are they hiding?  Sodium would be my educated guess. If you notice a flavor difference of Brand X vs Stanislaus, put a little salt on Brand X then try it....amazing it tastes the same !  Salt enhances the flavor of food...it also enhances our blood pressure levels.

If you are sampling other brands vs Stanislaus, the best way is to make a batch of sauce using brand X.  Adjust the sodium then compare with end products.  Then determine if it is worth an additional $3 to $4.00 per case.

6000 cases annual x $3.00 = $18,000 per year savings.  I don't know about you but I could use an additional $18,000 grand this year.

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BorgyBorgy

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Reply with quote  #29 

HoJo's may have grown in the 60's with location location location and a philosophy for consistancy but they died in the late 70's and 80's when they put the blinders on and no longer kept up with the changing times - they withered on the vine.  Ownership changes or not, they became a stepping stone and no longer a leader in the industry.  Pretty soon all they had were a few independent operators all doing thier own thing.  Point is, and most of you know this well by now, things change wether you do or not.  You either get out in front of it, or get left in the dust.  Dont stick your head in the sand, or let your salesperson be your only source of whats going on in the industry.  Keep cutting those cans and evaluate the product to the impact on your finished product.  Cut apples to apples, fresh pack to fresh pack, harvest to harvest...if its a top 10 item, cut it every year. 




 
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lambo

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Reply with quote  #30 
Quote:
Originally Posted by redsauce

I appreciate all the feedback. I have to agree though with trouser about companies in the East catching up to the West. We would have never thought of switching from Stanislaus to a Furmanos/Famoso tomato 10 years ago because the quality was not there. I was just surprised when we tried the tomatoes of how good the quality was. We wouldn't jeopardize our business if the tomato was not as good or better than the Stanislaus products. It does make sense about the 3000 miles Northeast distributors have to pay to get the Stanislaus tomato's and maybe this explains the cost of Stanislaus increasing just about every year. As an operator we appreciate a salesman offering us a product that will perform as well as the name brand and save us money at the same time. I am however concerned about Manufrep suggestion that Perkins could switch to another vendor because of a marketing agreement. I think Furmanos should market themselves to end users the same way as Stanislaus. It would help us to know if Perkins did switch packers that we could locate another distributor.


ever heard of DiNapolo tomato products
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FSVET

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Reply with quote  #31 
I would imagine that even the big brand name companies like Heinz, Sara Lee and Stouffer's are all getting into private label.

Quote:
Originally Posted by rat
Private Label is the fastest growing segment and among the most profitable in retail and foodservice.  And the distribution leaders are out there doing as much or more than the branded guys to insure the quality is consistent.  Having been involved in plant and facility tours, I can tell you that Gordon, Sysco and UniPro to name just a few are touring production facilities that process / manufacture private label products on an annual basis and are very picky.  Based on what I have seen, these large companies are very aware that consistency is the key to success and are very sure that anything with their name on it is as good or better quality than a branded item.

-Rat Bastard

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Antonio

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Reply with quote  #32 
Tman
You noticed that one replied to your comment on a ingredients label ?
Come 2020 it’s going to be the law
No more hiding for them.
For a tomato to taste the same year after year is virtually impossible unless there is a chemical process going on!!!!!
Best
AB
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