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marko1golf

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Reply with quote  #1 
Since this is a rumor sight, I heard one today, not positive how valid it is, but USF will hold off starting Cookbook pricing at the last DCs around the country?? Anyone else hear this? 
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SCURVYCHEF

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Reply with quote  #2 
I don't know but it's a horrible program.
It forces unwanted GP on the wrong items while the "Intel" on those below target push GP down. But it's ok. Reps can just take time out of their weekends to babysit the companies profits and catch stuff as it falls
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cartright

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Reply with quote  #3 
what is cookbook?
how does it work?

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SoCalFoodDude

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Reply with quote  #4 
Supposedly, Cookbook looks at similar types of foodservice operations and creates pricing based on whatever segment you're working on. It's supposed to make our lives easier by taking pricing out of our hands.

All I know is that our prices are more out of line than ever. The small independents are adding products and services to compete with US, Sysco and Shamrock. With less overhead, they can be very competitive. Their sales reps still take orders the old fashioned way. Visiting customers and writing things down.
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2 companies down

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Reply with quote  #5 
Visiting customers is still the best way to gain lines and to penetrate your accounts
. You stop going in and seeing your customers and they will stop seeing value. That's what we sell. Ourselves not the boxes
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commoditiesguy

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Reply with quote  #6 
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2 companies down
Visiting customers is still the best way to gain lines and to penetrate your accounts . You stop going in and seeing your customers and they will stop seeing value. That's what we sell. Ourselves not the boxes

You're exactly right!
Online ordering and direct-order-entry are fine concepts for chain accounts, healthcare, B&I, etc.

But street accounts aren't interested in an online order entry system.  They want to see the guy or gal in there weekly.  Answering questions.  Helping solve problems.  Introducing new items, in person, not online with a few neat recipes.

The upper management of these larger companies like Sysco, USF, etc, that have never, EVER made a sales call to a restaurant, just don't get it.  They see the expense they could strip out from the system by dumping sales reps and having their customers only interact with a machine, and their eyes light up.  Machines don't get sick, don't go on disability, don't sue companies, you get the point.
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FSVET

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Reply with quote  #7 
The upper management of these larger companies like Sysco, USF, etc, that have never, EVER made a sales call to a restaurant, just don't get it.  They see the expense they could strip out from the system by dumping sales reps and having their customers only interact with a machine, and their eyes light up.  Machines don't get sick, don't go on disability, don't sue companies, you get the point.

Most of the current senior management has never been on the street or haven't in a long, long time.

I've been doing this job long enough to remember when there were tons of competitors. No one company sold everything. Customers had grocery, meat, produce and dairy companies. Some even had frozen food, paper and equipment suppliers. You competed against other comapnies in your segment. Everyone had fun and everyone was making money.

Then the push to real one-stop shopping started. Margins dropped, and pressure mounted to get as much of a customer's business as you could get. Now we were getting phone calls about fatty meat, bad produce, and spoiled milk. And customers wanted replacement product NOW! So you'd cut your day short, drove to the warehouse (sometimes a 2-3 hour trip), picked up the product, and drove back to the customer to deliver it.

The push to get customers online and sell third-party services instead of food is killing this business.  Most of my customers don't care about these things. They want complete deliveries on time and at a decent price.

I'm so glad I don't have another 5 or 10 years in this business.

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LinesInTheSand

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Reply with quote  #8 
I found that customers punching their own orders saved me time, stress, money and credits.  Most of the ones that punched their own orders paid online too.  So less running around collecting checks, or calling the credit department to get people turned on...

If you don't want to make your life easier, that's your prerogative.  As for me, I like working smarter and doing what I want to do in the evening because punching high amounts of customer orders + running around for checks = working later than necessary.


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2 companies down

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Reply with quote  #9 
I see how that can make your life easier, but you have to ask yourself, who has the relationship with the customer? You or USF.com? Who owns the account you or the company? I own my business. And I am not letting anyone else Control it.
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SCURVYCHEF

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Reply with quote  #10 
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2 companies down
I see how that can make your life easier, but you have to ask yourself, who has the relationship with the customer? You or USF.com? Who owns the account you or the company? I own my business. And I am not letting anyone else Control it.


I just left a customer's place. I sat with the chef for an hour during lunch service discussed a couple samples I brought. After that we talked about our hopes and dreams and aspirations. We discussed his concept and future opportunities to expand on that. It was probably one of the best calls I've had in a long time.

He's doing his inventory currently and will put in his order online. Our time wasn't filled with me looking up prices and pitching cliche rubbish to help build my order. I went to the parking lot and did a transmission and checked over another customer submitted order and noticed two items I showed him yesterday were on his order.

If you put your customers online and the relationship suffers it isn't the software that is killing your relationship, it's the way you manage your time when you see them.

I own those accounts. And oh yah btw, I'm done for the day, going back to office to work on admin stuff and close up some major deals I'm working on.
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