InsideFood Message Board
Register Calendar
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment  
marko1golf

Member
Registered:
Posts: 25
Reply with quote  #1 
How many of you USFOOD TM's have will call vans at your disposal, I'm curious, we were sitting at our Scoop roll out, and at our table was the corporate chef "EGG". I'm sure you know who I'm talking about. He was shocked that will still didn't have will call vans. I work at one of the largest houses in the country, and we still run food like slaves. Just wondering if we are the last hold outs? And by the way, this is by far the most pressure we have ever seen to reach 50% customer penetration on Scoop since the beginning, and we are only half way through. Any others getting the same hourly emails telling them "how badly they suck" because they are not at 50% yet...
__________________
Marko1golf
0
SCURVYCHEF

Avatar / Picture

Member
Registered:
Posts: 22
Reply with quote  #2 
Haha. Hello my brother from parts unknown!

My division has vans (or maybe just one) but they really aren't for anything other than big emergencies and taking large sums of product to meetings and drop off points. I have seen a relief driver show up in one when a driver breaks down or falls behind and they break up the load, ect... We still have to do the grunt work though. Lol

This scoop was the hardest. It had the lowest amount of receptiveness i have seen yet. And yes we always get alot of pressure too. It starts at the top and trickles down. Doesn't matter what tier of the pyramid you lie in. You just need to look better and not worse than they others at your level.

You gotta know when to read your customers. Alot of them are fatigued with "scoop" and no one needs to risk their relationships begging for favors all the time. But there are certainly opportunities just may not be with more than half your customers. But i had the worste scoop turn out yet this time. Certainly combination of the line up and people just wanting to get away front it soon as i showed it. Even my customers that genuinely love scoop only took a few cases and that was all.
0
broadliner

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member III
Registered:
Posts: 673
Reply with quote  #3 
As far aas I know, the California divisions are the only ones with will call vans. This was the reaction to Sysco getting busted in Northern California for storing refrigerated and frozen products in various self-service storage yards.

We can't put ANYTHING in our cars! Not even canned goods, nonfoods or chemicals. We can't even go to Restaurant Sepot, Costco, Smart & Final or Sam's Club to pick up something. Supposedly, we can get fired. 

We have to reserve a van if we need to do a will call. I had to take out a van for two cases of 6/10 spaghetti sauce. This entails reserving a van (hopefully), driving to the division, loading the van, making the delivery and driving back to the division to pick up your car. A two to three hour process at the very least.

There is an AM and a PM van that is driven by one of the junior drivers. They are only for recoveries (shorts, mispicks, subs). You're screwed if you miss the either cutoff. 

Then you have to ask your customer if they'd like to pick it up. Sometimes we get lucky, and a customer will. Otherwise, you have to beg and plead for an off-day delivery.

Great food. Made easy, my ass.
0
DELIDUDE

Newbie
Registered:
Posts: 5
Reply with quote  #4 
My division has a couriers service that they use every day. This company must make bank because they are at the division at least 5 to 10xs per day. However its mostly used for National Accounts. If your a TM....your schlepping yourself.
 
0
foodpolitician

Junior Member
Registered:
Posts: 15
Reply with quote  #5 
Our branch has one will call van that we lease yearly.  It goes out usually once a day, and they have a cutoff of 9 -10 am usually depending on how many stops it has to make.  
It has been a life/account saver for when things are shorted, missing, or extremely urgent.   
We are only allowed to take dry grocery in our vehicle to our customers, so all others, if there is a need, have to go on the will call van.   
It helps give service when we personally can't, since it is cause for dismissal to take perishables to a customer....

Still sucks that I can't take full care of my customers if needed, when another local broadline distributor in our area allows ANY product to be taken to the customers by the reps.
0
Drew2569

Junior Member
Registered:
Posts: 10
Reply with quote  #6 
I'm a TM in the South region and our division has two vans. Mostly for the 2 metro areas we have in our footprint. However we are still allowed to pick up product from our will call area at the division, or send it to our local drop site and get product from the delivery truck. With our amount of shorts, mis-picks and out of stocks, the drop site are always busy with TM's loading up their vehicle to recover from our lack of service/operations. In fact I'm running 3 cases, that were mis-picked tomorrow morning. This is almost a daily occurrence.
0
foodpolitician

Junior Member
Registered:
Posts: 15
Reply with quote  #7 
ok.  I'm not a US Foods TM, but, curious what exactly is SCOOP?   
0
Food Seller

Member
Registered:
Posts: 24
Reply with quote  #8 
What is Scoop? Your worst nightmare!!
0
SoCalFoodDude

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member II
Registered:
Posts: 422
Reply with quote  #9 
Quote:
Originally Posted by foodpolitician
ok.  I'm not a US Foods TM, but, curious what exactly is SCOOP?   


SCOOP is a series of seasonal promotions on supposedly exclusive items that can only be purchased from USF. They are sold as items that can extend menus by offering items that may be too costly or difficult for a chef to make from scratch. 

There have been issues where some products took off and the manufacturers got caught short. There was an instance on the last Scoop where the manufacturer of the pumpkin ice cream ran out of product, and wouldn't re-open production.

The big issue for many USF TMs and AEs is that we get beat over the head to get to a certain percentage within two or three weeks. We have customers who genuinely like Scoop items, and always purchase at least one or two products. Others have little to no interest, but will buy a case or two to help out their rep. After the initial push, most of us are reduced to begging customers to take a case to keep management off our butts.

If we are lucky, there are case/each items that we can sell 1 each of to get on the scoreboard. One Scoop had an pocket thermometer that sold out in five minutes because everybody sold one to almost everybody.

What started out as an interesting way to sell has turned into a chore we all dread.

Why, US Foods?
0
SoCalFoodDude

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member II
Registered:
Posts: 422
Reply with quote  #10 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Drew2569
I'm a TM in the South region and our division has two vans. Mostly for the 2 metro areas we have in our footprint. However we are still allowed to pick up product from our will call area at the division, or send it to our local drop site and get product from the delivery truck. With our amount of shorts, mis-picks and out of stocks, the drop site are always busy with TM's loading up their vehicle to recover from our lack of service/operations. In fact I'm running 3 cases, that were mis-picked tomorrow morning. This is almost a daily occurrence.


Drew, all California TMs and AEs are prohibited from putting ANYTHING in our cars, except for samples. Sysco San Francisco got busted for putting refrigerated and frozen items in unrefrigerated storage lockers. Go on Youtube and search "Sysco/KRON". Channel 4 did several segments about it. Sysco was sued by the State of California and paid a $20 million dollar fine.
0
Drew2569

Junior Member
Registered:
Posts: 10
Reply with quote  #11 
I'm well aware of the Sysco fiasco. We are all anticipating the day we were not allowed to deliver product in our vehicles. I'm glad it hasn't happened yet, due to constant chaos our warehouse is in. We have been having some major staffing issue and it's been a real struggle the last 6 months. I'm sure it's rampant among many broad-line distributors. 
0
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply